Diagram of the Fundamental Elements of a River Rafting Boat

When it comes to river rafting boats, the inflatable raft has fundamental elements that every member of a rafting team should know. In today’s blog, we’ll diagram those essential elements on a raft, pointing out and describing each area, including but not limited to:

  • Bow of a raft
  • River raft stern
  • Chafe pad
  • The thwart
  • Raft tube
  • A baffle
  • Seams
  • Raft Floor
  • Pressure release valve

River Rafting Boat

Most novice river-rafters in the four states region of U. S. know the bow and the stern area on a river raft. As the sport has grown and gained popularity, raft designs have evolved to meet the varying river conditions.

So whether you’re rafting down the calm waters of the Elk River near Noel, Missouri, or rafting the class I rapids of the Big Sugar near Pineville, Missouri, here are the essential design elements of a river raft.

Bow of a Raft

The front of a raft, or any watercraft, is known as the bow. The bow gives a raft lift to go over the waves, providing a drier float trip. There are also low-rise rafts commonly used along the Elk River, which is a calm water float trip.

River Raft Stern

The back of a raft is known as the stern. It’s commonly where a river guide would sit to perform master maneuvers for steering the boat on a whitewater rafting trip. But when it comes to the easy-flowing waters of the Elk River and the Big Sugar, you can self-guide your river float.

Chafe Pad

The chafe pads lower the friction caused by wear and tear since this is where you sit and paddle in a river raft.

The Thwart

The cross-section pieces are known as thwarts, which are positioned perpendicularly to the raft tubes to add rigidity to the raft. In addition, thwarts can act as a foothold to give paddlers leverage and support in swift-moving currents.

Raft Tube

All river rafts get designed with an air-filled tube, which gives a raft its buoyancy to stay afloat on a river. The perimeter tube gets subdivided into individual sections. The minimum diameter is 15 to 16 inches. The more surface area, the greater the flotation capacity.

A Baffle

The sections around the perimeter of the raft are the baffles, essentially individual chambers of air. A single raft can have as many baffles as needed, from bow to stern, to encompass the entire floor of a raft to hold 2 to 8 people. If one chamber, or baffle, gets punctured, the raft will stay afloat.

Seams

Each baffle gets conjoined through a specialty welding process that fuses two baffles that form the seams between each baffle.

Raft Floor

Like the baffles, the raft floor gets adhered to the bottom of the tube. Depending upon a specific raft’s design, the floor is sometimes wrapped entirely around the outside of the tube for added strength for whitewater rafting. However, the rivers of Southwest Missouri are not known for having wild whitewater rafting.

Pressure Release Valves

Also, a feature of a raft floor is the pressure-release valves found commonly on self-bailing rafts. Valves can get checked easily for leaks by sitting on the sides to listen for hissing.

Raft Valve

Inside the raft are side valves too. Although these valves can get blocked by gear in a loaded raft, the valves should be readily accessible in the event of over-inflation, or there’s an urgent hot air expanse that needs to be released.

Book Your Next River Float Trip

Book your next river float at Lazy Days Resort near Noel, MO, your premier rental location for river float trips. They also offer full hookup RVing, tent campsites, or cabin stays. Book your stay today at Lazy Days Resort and Campground today!

Getting to Lazy Days Resort & Campground is a one-minute drive southwest of Interstate 49. Take exit 5 at mile marker 6. The resort is between the charming towns of Noel and Pineville, Missouri.

Two Simple River Rafting Paddle Maneuvers In Every River-goers Toolbox

River floats are a popular outdoor activity during the summer months throughout southwest Missouri. It’s an excellent way to make memories that last a lifetime with friends.

But every river-goer knowns that there are two essential paddle maneuvers needed to easily navigate the easy-flowing waters of the Elk River near Noel, Missouri, which are:

  • Forward stroke
  • Reverse stroke

Each stroke has a directional purpose in a river raft and is easy to complete, whether the river current is easy and slow or fast-moving with many rapids. By understanding how each of these paddle strokes work, you will be able to complete a successful river launch and navigate your way:

  • Across a river
  • downriver, or
  • Upriver, if you choose

Successful Completion of Any Paddle Stroke Technique

For any paddle stroke to be completed successfully, it’s essential to know the three phases of a single stroke.

  1. Catch phase
  2. Power phase
  3. Recovery phase

By understanding these phases and how they work together, you can conserve energy for a more relaxing, good time on your river float trip.

The Catch Phase

The most critical phase out of the three is the catch phase. At this phase, a paddle blade makes first contact with the water. For the step to get completed successfully, the paddle blade must be fully plunged into the water up to the paddle throat before the power phase begins.

The Power Phase

Now the power phase, or power stroke, can begin. With all paddlers working in unison, this phase is the most efficient and effective way to move across the water.

Each paddler in the raft will hold on to the t-grip of the paddle using their inside hand coming cross-body to grasp the t-grip while the outside hand holds onto the shaft; in unison, the paddlers in the boat lean forward to drag the raft past the paddle(s). It is the in-unison work that gives this phase its name, power.

The Recovery Phase

The final phase of a stroke is the recovery phase when the paddle blade is lifted from the water and brought forward before plunging into the water to execute another stroke.

Forward Stroke for Maximum Efficiency

The forward stroke is the single most important paddle stroke in a river float. It propels a raft forward while keeping the boat in a straight line. When done correctly, it’s an incredibly efficient technique that saves you energy and keeps your raft moving swiftly.

Reverse Stroke for Directional Control

The reverse paddle stroke, sometimes called the back stroke, is an essential technique for river rafting and other river sports. It gives you maximum control over your raft’s direction. The method involves paddling in a backward direction while facing forward, which helps you to make quick turns and navigate through narrow passages.

Book A River Float Today

Booking a river float with Lazy Days Resort is easy. If you have specific dates in mind, you can check all the available dates through their online booking system for floats down:

The resort is situated between Pineville and Noel, Missouri. Getting to Lazy Days Resort is a short one-minute drive southwest of Interstate 49. Take exit 5 at mile marker 6.

If you have a minute or two, read what our past guests had to say about their stays.

Differences Between Float Trips and Whitewater Rafting

Two of North America’s most popular outdoor activities during the summer months are float trips and whitewater rafting. But there are some distinct differences between each.

Float trips involve a leisurely journey down a river in an inflatable boat, while whitewater rafting is a more intense adventure on rapids and fast-moving water. 

Float Trips—Enjoy the Calm Relaxation of Slow Moving Water

A unique way to relax and enjoy nature is a river float. Imagine the peacefulness of floating down a river, taking in the sights and sounds of nature around you. A river float can be an incredibly calming experience, allowing you to take some time away from the flurry of activity that comes from everyday life. It’s also an opportunity to reconnect with friends or family while enjoying the calm cooling waters to beat the summer heat.

Whether you’re looking for a peaceful getaway or an exciting adventure, river floats have something for everyone. There are many benefits to going on a river float, such as cooling off, spending time with friends, and sipping on a refreshing cocktail. With the proper preparation, you can ensure that your river float is full of good times.

Whitewater Rafting—Navigating Rough Waters With an Experienced Guide

Whitewater rafting is a thrill seeker’s paradise, all while getting a full-body workout. From navigating rapids with an experienced guide, you can safely and enjoy a thrill-seeking adventure down a rapidly moving river.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The river most frequently mentioned in Lazy Days blogs is Elk River, a gently flowing river with few obstacles, and swimming in the river is easy. The other river is the Big Sugar Creek, which has ripples and tiny waves with few obstructions and is shallow in spots, and the risk to swimmers is minimal, making self-rescue easy. Most rivers in Missouri are too slow to even rank on American Whitewater’s benchmark for whitewater rapids.

How the Non-Profit, American Whitewater, Classifies Rivers

The International Scale of Whitewater Difficulty, created in the 1950s by American Whitewater. It is NOT exact, and NOT all rivers can fit into each category. The scale is simply a guide.

Class I Rapids are fast-moving currents with small waves and ripples. Obstacles are easily missed by rafters with little training, knowledge, and experience. The risk is slight to swimmers, and self-rescue is easy. Most rivers in Missouri fall within this category or do not rank at all.

Class II Rapids is for novice beginners–a straightforward approach without the need to scout out the river path beforehand. Waves are mid-sized, and obstacles are occasional but easily avoidable with training or a river guide–very few rivers in Missouri rank as Class II.

Class III Rapids is for intermediate paddlers. Most Class III rapids occur in Class II rivers in Missouri and are quick maneuverable obstacles with low risk. River obstacles are more frequent and may be challenging to avoid, because of the fast-moving currents. Scouting the river ahead of time is advisable but optional. The class III rapids often come with a few strong eddies.

Class IV Rapids is for advanced paddlers. These rivers are not considered float trips. There is a great deal of hard paddling, and you must listen to the instruction of your river guide to navigate chutes, big waves, long rapids, and eddy turns. Self-rescue can be difficult, so the risk is low to moderate.

Class V Rapids are for expert paddlers. Rivers in this class often contain large drops and unavoidable waves, holes, and congested chutes that require complex maneuvers. Rapids often continue for long distances, so paddlers should have a high fitness level. Swimming is hazardous and often tricky. But luckily, there are NO rivers in Missouri that contain class V rapids.

Book A Float Down Elk River or the Big Sugar Creek

If you’re ready for a relaxing river float, book your first float down the Elk River and your second float for the next day on Big Sugar Creek at the premier rental location for rafts, kayaks, and canoes at Lazy Days Campground in Noel, MO.

Lazy Days Resort is easy to get to from Interstate 49. They are located a short one-minute drive southwest of I-49; take exit 5 at mile marker 6.

Read what our recent guests had to say about their stay at Lazy Days!

Reasons to Plan Your May River Excursions by Booking in Advance

A unique way to explore the natural beauty of rivers and wildlife inhabitants is to plan your May river excursions. Adventures in float trips are best accomplished in a canoe, kayak, or raft with close friends.

River floats also provide an opportunity to get away from it all and enjoy a fun-filled weekend adventure while taking in stunning views and making memories that will last a lifetime. Whether you are looking for a relaxing time with friends on the river or a little more adventure, there is something for everyone on a river float in McDonald County near Noel, Missouri.

Book The Perfect May River Excursions

Floating trips are a great way to escape the humdrum of everyday life, whether looking for a peaceful float down a lazy river or a class II float with very few rapids.

With so many to choose from, finding the perfect float excursion can be challenging. Some factors to consider are the following:

  • The skill level of the river
  • River gear and equipment supplies (i.e., rivercraft and paddles)
  • Accommodations for you and your friends

Skill Level of a River

The skill level of a river can vary greatly depending on the category it falls into. Rivers get divided into several classes based on these characteristics, such as the river width, the water depth, the obstacles present in it—such as rocks or boulders, and the speed or current of the water, commonly referred to as the CFS (cubic feet per second) of a river.

Each class has a skill level, ranging from easy to expert. Knowing what class a river falls into is essential for determining its skill level and preparing for your journey.

We’ll talk more about river classifications in our next blog. Still, for this blog and the region we are talking about near Noel and Pineville, Missouri, the Elk River is a gently flowing river that’s easy to swim against its current, making it a great float river.

River Gear and Equipment Supplies

For those looking to explore the rivers of McDonald County near Noel and Pineville, Missouri, there are a few must-haves in river gear and equipment essentials to enjoy the Elk River or the Big Sugar Creek properly. From river-crafts, like a:

  • Six- or an eight-person raft
  • Two- or a single-person kayak
  • One or two-person canoe

You’ll also need these critical river gear and equipment supplies for an enjoyable experience on a river float.

  • Paddles
  • Floatation devices
  • Food and drinking water

Most river outfitters along the Elk River offer all three river crafts accompanied by paddles so that you can make sure you and your friends can easily navigate the gentle river currents.

Accommodations for You and Your Friends

If you know where to begin looking, you can find the perfect place to stay that can accommodate all of your friends while meeting every person’s needs and wants. Luckily, there are plenty of cabin options at the Lazy Days Resort and Campground.

Their resort offers you and your friends twelve cabin sizes that comfortably sleep groups as small as four to as large as thirty. In addition, they provide full RV hookup sites and on-site tent camping. With these options in mind, you and your friends can find the perfect place to stay that meets all your needs, including plenty of parking space, all while staying within budget.

Book in Advance for Your May River Excursions

Planning May river excursions are a great way to enjoy the outdoors and have fun in the sun. But it is essential to book in advance to ensure you guarantee a raft gets secured for you and your friends.

By booking your May river float online today, you ensure you will have plenty of time to prepare for your adventure and that all of the necessary arrangements are taken care of before your arrival. So don’t delay—today, book your river float down the Elk River or the Big Sugar Creek with the river outfitter, Lazy Days Resort and Campground!

The resort location is along the Elk River banks; they are just a one-minute drive West of Interstate 49 at exit 5 near mile marker 6. Come enjoy your summer with your friends along the Elk River!

Book Your May 1st Cabin Holiday Along the Elk River in Pineville, MO, Before New Year’s Day 2023

If you are starting to plan your first Spring vacation for May 1, 2023, why not plan a cabin holiday near Pineville, MO, before New Year’s Day? The picturesque location offers visitors plenty of outdoor activities and breathtaking scenery. You can book your stay online or by phone at Lazy Days Resort.

Kicking Off Your Summer Vacation With A Cabin Holiday

A cabin holiday along Elk River near Pineville, MO, is an ideal way to kick off your summer vacation plans in style and splendor. The natural beauty of the area, combined with all the amenities and activities of a modern city, make this the perfect destination for families, friends, couples, or individuals looking to get away after the long winter.

Cabin Stay Adventures

During your cabin vacation along the Elk River banks outside Pineville, MO, visitors can access the river for activities such as:

  • Lure fishing or fly fishing
  • Paddle a tandem kayak
  • River rafting as a group
  • Trail hiking to take in nature’s canvas
  • Simply relaxing along the river banks to absorb the breathtaking beauty of the area.

And for those looking for a more leisurely stay, Pineville is home to some great dining restaurant dinning and shopping in Missouri.

Cabin Options

With twelve cabin options, you’ll find something that meets all your expectations. Whether it’s a rustic cabin stay with only one room and an outdoor grill for cooking to a cabin with a deck overlooking the river, you’ll be able to find the cabin of your choice here at Lazy Days Resort.

We want to ensure you get the most out of your stay, so we offer various services and amenities to enhance your experience. Whether it’s a romantic retreat or a fun-filled rafting weekend, we have all you’ll need for a memorable stay.

From a fully equipped luxury treehouse cabin that sleeps twelve to cabins that can sleep groups of 10 to 30 people. You’ll find something for everyone at Lazy Days. Some cabins have fireplaces; while others have outdoor grills, porches, decks, and more to help you get the most out of your stay.

Booking Your Cabin Stay

With activities such as fishing, hiking, and river rafting all available within proximity of your cabin, you can find something fun for everyone. Guarantee your Spring cabin vacation today and start a new holiday tradition for you and your family by booking before New Year’s Day.

We look forward to helping you plan the perfect Cabin getaway this Spring along the Elk River in Pineville, MO. Contact us today for more information at (417) 223-3498, or get started now by booking your stay online today! We look forward to making you and your family’s cabin vacation memorable.

From small to large groups, Lazy Days Resort has twelve cabins to choose from for parties as small as one up to groups of 30 people. Our affordable lodging rates ensure the perfect cabin stay along Elk River in Pineville, Missouri, that fits your budget and needs.

Your Guide to Fall Foliage on Your Autumn Float Trip Along the Elk River

Fall is just days away, and there’s no better time to book an Autumn float trip than right now! To better prepare you for the Fall colors, we’ve put together this easy reference guide to help you identify those beautiful fall foliage.

Like so many states with striking Fall colors, Missouri is no exception. Fall in Missouri can last four to six weeks with showy displays of vibrant reds, brilliant oranges, dazzling golds, and bold purples.

Mid-October is often the time to take in those Fall colors. Although Missouri is host to a wide variety of foliage and plant life, residents are lucky to see the showy display that begins mid-September and wraps up sometime in mid-November. 

Mid-September Foliage

In about one week, early Fall colors emerge. Among the top forerunners of Fall color displays are:

  • Sassafras Tree
  • Sumac Shrub
  • Virginia Creeper Vine

Sassafras Trees

The leaves of a sassafras tree are uniquely shaped teardrops, often coming to three rounded points on each leaf. In early autumn, the sassafras leaves give off a brilliant display of reds, oranges, and yellows that intermingle with the natural bright green.

Sumac Shrub

The sumac bush is a magnificent sight of all the shrubs during the Fall. Its fern-like foliage lights up a forest floor with oranges, purples, and reds.

Virginia Creeper Vine

The Virginia creeper vine will adorn all it climbs with its rich hues of red. Unlike other North American creeping vines, like poison ivy, which display oranges and yellows, the Virginia creeper will envelop a tree trunk or building with Mother Nature’s paint.  

Peak Fall Colors

By mid-October, the Fall color heavyweights completely take over, which include the:

  • Maple trees
  • Ash varieties
  • Oak woods
  • Hickory trees

Maple Trees

The maple tree is well-known for giving a dazzling Fall show of rich reds, golden yellows, and orange ambers. Although there are 100 maple varieties around the globe, only twelve are native to the North American continent. The Missouri Department of Conservation only recognizes five as native to our state.

  1. Silver, or soft, maple
  2. Red maple
  3. Sugar, also known as a hard or black maple
  4. Box elder, or ash-leaved maple
  5. Amur, or Siberian, maple

Ash Varieties

Of the nearly 60 species of ash tree found all over the World, Missouri has six native varieties that range in magnificent hues of reds, golden yellows, brilliant oranges, and deep purples.

  1. Green
  2. White 
  3. Blue 
  4. Pumpkin
  5. Sullivan
  6. Biltmore

Oak Wood

Oak trees grow abundantly throughout Missouri, with nearly 22 known species and 30 oak hybrids. The Fall colors of the oak tree consist of deep reddish browns to dark, dusty yellows. 

With nearly four out of every five trees in Missouri being oak trees, it’s easy to understand how you might think the Missouri state tree is an oak. But you would be wrong; the state tree is the flowering dogwood.

Hickory Trees

Although hickory trees are prevalent throughout Missouri, only 17 known species exist worldwide. Fifteen of those species reside on the North American Continent. Interestingly, there are eight species of hickory native to Missouri. 

The hickory tree produces deep rich reds, yellows, and purples during peak Fall colors in Mid-October.

Book Your Fall Elk River Float Trip

Now that you know how to identify the foliage along your float down the Elk River this Autumn, you can book a relaxing Fall float trip for you and your family by contacting the premier rental location for Elk River float trips at the Lazy Days Resort & Campground in Noel, MO

If you’re looking for a relaxing Fall weekend stay, Lazy Days Campground offers premier Elk River RVing, tent campsites, and cabin rentals. Call Lazy Days Resort today to book your Elk River RVing site now!

The resort is a one-minute drive southwest of Interstate 49; take exit 5 at mile marker 6. The resort sits nestled between the Ozark mountain towns of Noel and Pineville, Missouri.

We invite you to read past guest experiences at Lazy Days Resort.

Essential Paddle Grips Every River Floater Should Know

Whether you’re new to river sports or a born river explorer, there is much to be said about proper paddle grips. While gripping a river paddle may seem instinctive, improperly grasping a paddle with both hands holding onto the shaft is a primary reason for injuries sustained in the boat. Although, keep in mind that most rivers in Missouri are easy enough to float down without an expert river guide.

So if you’re paddling down the easy flow of the Elk River outside Noel, Missouri, or maneuvering the class I or II rapids in the Big Sugar Creek near Pineville, Missouri, paddle grip is an essential piece of knowledge that serves you and your fellow floaters well.

Paddle Grips

Regarding paddle grip, keeping hold of a paddle while rafting, canoeing, or kayaking a river ranked as a class I rapid or above is essential. However, it may not be as crucial while floating down Elk River because it’s rated lower than a class I rapid, making it an ideal family-friendly float. 

Therefore, knowing the two common paddle types can help you better prepare for when you must paddle. Whether you’re launching from the river edge or paddling to shore, there are different grip styles for both of these paddles:

  • Single-blade Paddle
  • Double-blade Paddle

Single-Blade Paddle

Canoes and rafts generally come outfitted with a single-blade paddle because there can be more than one paddler for these types of watercraft.

Single-blade paddles come with two different types of grips: asymmetrical and T-grip. The asymmetrical grip generally gets used in lake crafts, like canoes. However, most river vessels come with a T-grip design.

Both grip designs give a paddler the most significant leverage with the least resistance. Depending upon which side of the craft you are paddling on, you will always wrap your palm around the T-grip cross body.

For example, paddlers on a raft on the right side of the boat will grasp the T-grip with their left hand. While paddlers on the left side of the rivercraft hold the t-grip using their right hand.

In a canoe, it depends upon whether there is a solo paddler or a two-person paddle team. If there are two paddlers, the team must communicate well which side of the boat they should paddle on to direct the craft to shore or cross-river. 

For solo paddlers with single blades, it’s a matter of swapping hand positions to ensure the cross-body hand is always holding the paddle grip, depending upon which side of the canoe the blade is on. 

In other words, if the blade is in the water to the paddler’s left, the right-hand grasps the T-grip. If the paddle blade is in the water to the paddler’s right, the left hand will grab the top of the T-grip (as seen with the paddler above). 

The other hand will always hold on to the shaft. For canoes, that will depend upon where you’re seated, in the bow (front) or the stern (rear). It will be the strongest paddler sitting at the stern who instructs the person seated at the bow. That’s because the person in the stern will steer the boat.

However, paddling in a river raft is different. First, it depends upon which side of the craft you sit on. If you’re seated on the port (left) side of the raft, your left hand will hold onto the shaft of the paddle, while those sitting on the starboard (right) side of the vessel grasp the paddle shaft with the right hand. 

Double-Blade Paddle

On the other hand, kayakers use a double-blade paddle, which provides greater efficiency in traversing river currents and slightly improves a kayaker’s speed. For kayakers paddle lengths can range from approximately 79″ to 81″. 

The blades are typically feathered and can rotate using a center ferrule, meaning the blades on a kayak paddle can rotate in opposing directions. That gives kayakers an advantage in wind conditions and the ability to paddle upstream.

The grip on a double-blade paddle is pretty straightforward: you wrap both hands around the shaft between the blades. Keeping your hands slightly wider than shoulder length apart and bent at 90 degrees at the elbow is the most comfortable position in a kayak.

Book A Stay Along Elk River in Missouri

Looking for an ideal location along the Elk River? Contact Lazy Days in Noel, MO, the premier rental site for river float trips. They offer prime Elk River RVing, tent campsites, and recently upgraded cabin rentals. So book your stay today at Lazy Days Resort and Campground!

Getting to Lazy Days Campground is a one-minute drive southwest of Interstate 49. Take exit 5 at mile marker 6. The resort location sits between the charming towns of Noel and Pineville, Missouri.

Read what past guests had to say about Lazy Days Resort.

Choosing A River Float Craft for You and Your Fellow Floaters

Whether you’re a novice river rafter or an expert river kayaker, knowing which river float craft is suitable can be a big decision for yourself and your fellow floaters. That’s where this helpful tool can help you make the best selection when booking your next Elk River or Big Sugar float trip.

You’ll discover the specific differences between three float vessel options commonly available to choose from when you book your stay at a Noel, MO, campground on Elk River.

  • River raft
  • Individual kayak
  • Tandem kayak
  • Multi-person canoe

Elk River and Big Sugar Creek

There are some distinct differences between Elk River and Big Sugar Creek.

The Elk River is an ideal family-friendly river with few rapids and fewer river obstacles. Presently running at a depth of 4.28 feet, making its flow rate suitable and manageable for river floaters seeking to cool off. On the other hand, the Big Sugar Creek categorizes below a class I rapid, and at certain times of the year, it ranks as a class II.

The Big Sugar is running at a depth between 3.90 and 5.88 feet. Although considered low in some areas, the chances of a watercraft dragging the river bottom or having to portage are low.

River Raft

There are two standard river rafts for any Elk River float trip. There is a 12-13 foot raft that seats six people comfortably. You can also select a 14-15 foot raft for 8-people. Both crafts are well suited for a gentle float down Elk River with little paddling and negotiating required. 

Individual Kayak

If you are one for individual sports, a personal kayak is ideal for you or anyone paddling alongside you down the Elk River or the Big Sugar Creek. Bound to deliver a unique kayaking experience to test your reflexes and challenge you with a good cardio workout.

Tandem Kayak

Two-person kayaks, also known as tandem kayaks, are an excellent choice for those who play well on a team. You’ll work together to paddle to increase or slow your speed as a team. The perfect watercraft for any couples weekend in a Noel, Missouri, campground.

Tandem kayaks perform well on Elk River and Big Sugar Creek this time of year.

Multi-Person Canoe

Most canoes can be paddled down river easily by one or two people. But most canoes can hold up to three people comfortably. These river vessels are superior in lightweight aluminum construction that shine in paddle control down Elk River or the Big Sugar Creek.

Book Your Elk River RVing Campsite

If you’re ready for a relaxing weekend stay, Lazy Days Resort and Campground is a one-minute drive southwest of Interstate 49. Take exit 5 at mile marker 6. The resort is conveniently nestled between the towns of Noel and Pineville, Missouri.

Lazy Days in Noel, MO, is the premier rental for river float trips. Call Lazy Days to book your Elk River RVing site now

Discover what other guests had to say about Lazy Days Resort.